08.01.2020: WiDH presents Karina Candrian (Medtech Entrepreneur)

We are very excited to announce that our next guest speaker will be Karina Candrian, Medtech Entrepreneur.

WHAT TO EXPECT

Healthcare innovators often struggle to bring their products to market. One of the reasons is the increasing regulatory requirements, especially due to the introduction of MDR/IVDR.

There are fears that numerous innovations will not make it onto the market, or at least only with big delay. This, due to prohibitively high costs for maintaining product approvals or new approvals under the Medical Device Regulation (MDR) / In Vitro Medical Device Regulation (IVDR). Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are especially vulnerable.

Karina Candrian will talk about the challenges SMEs are facing with the introduction of the new MDR / IVDR and will present examples of innovators and medical technology companies that have overcome the obstacles of increasing regulatory requirements.

Complementary, Dr. sc. Susanne Suter (Project Manager and Software Engineer, Supercomputing Systems) will illustrate a practical show-case of a machine-learning-based medical software application, which is at the beginning of the medical certification process.

ABOUT KARINA CANDRIAN

Karina Candrian holds a Master’s degree in Economics from the University of Zurich and has more than 18 years of experience in the healthcare industry. Through her work as a consultant and in operative responsibilities in various management positions of MedTech companies she has profound experience not only in this industry, but also throughout the entire value chain, from strategic alignment, product idea up to sales and distribution.

She is founder of 3 companies, all dedicated to innovation in Healthcare. As co-founder and CEO of Effectum Medical, she is dedicated in accelerating innovation in MedTech by offering services in quality management and regulatory affairs and acting as legal manufactures for customers.

AGENDA

18:00 Door opening and registration

18:30 Intro by „Women in Digital Health“ and SCS

18:40 Insights by Karina Candrian and Susanne Suter, followed by a small discussion

approx. 20:00: Networking apéro

LOCATION

Supercomputing Systems AG
Technoparkstrasse 1
8005 Zürich

For tickets:

This event is open to ALL genders. Join us and be inspired!

Our thanks go to Supercomputing Systems for the great support!

11.12.2019: Christmas Afterwork Drinks 2019 with Women in Digital Health

Dear community,

Soon it’s Christmas time and we would like to continue our tradition of meeting you for an informal Christmas afterwork drink on the 11th December between 18.15 and 18.30 at The Singing Christmas Tree and «Wiehnachtsmärt» at Werdmühleplatz in Zurich (a short walk from Zurich main station).

On this occasion we look forward to raising our glasses to a successful past year and of course to the upcoming season with exciting events, lively discussions and new contacts.

We are meeting at the corner of Gidor Coiffeur, Werdmühleplatz 3 (behind Christmas tree).

Please make sure to arrive between 18:15 and 18:30. After that we will move and later on help us to mulled wine and ginger bread 🙂
Due to weather conditions we might change location to a more comfortable one. All genders are welcome.

The Singing Christmas Tree in Zurich

AGENDA

6:15-6:30 pm: Meet at the corner of Gidor Coiffeur, Wedmühleplatz 3 (behind the Christmas tree)

6:30 pm – late: Casual networking over mulled wine and ginger bread 🙂

LOCATION
The Singing Christmas Tree and <<Wiehnachtsmärt>> at Werdmühleplatz in Zurich.

Please write us in Meetup if you can’t find us right away. 🙂

Find out more about the Singing Christmas Tree:
https://www.singingchristmastree.ch/impressionen

06.11.2019: WiDH & iWiS present – “Digital Healthcare – Transforming Patient Care”

In partnership with the International Women in Science (iWiS), we are very excited to announce our joint event in Basel with guest speakers Christine K. Jacob, founder & managing director of Digi-Bridges, Silja Chouquet, founder & CEO of merakoi, and Dr. Helene Mountz, Global Marketing Director, PAH Market Development, Actelion – Johnson & Johnson with the topic “Digital Healthcare: Transforming Patient Care”.

WHAT IS THIS EVENT ABOUT AND WHY IS THIS RELEVANT

Big Data is reinventing how we address global healthcare challenges. Good quality healthcare data and lots of it can power groundbreaking medical innovation. Data informs strategic healthcare policies, and can potentially, when used in collaboration with Artificial Intelligence technology, minimize global health risks through improved prediction. Factors such as rampant bad data as well as public distrust in data privacy and digital healthcare solutions, continue to present significant challenges.

Christine Jacob, founder and managing director of Digi-Bridges will present: The Promise of Health Data: Is it really the new Oil? Research shows that clinicians express concerns related to issues such as data safety and security, interpretation, analysis, and dissemination, the flexibility to adjust what to track and how records and summaries are presented, and workflow integration. So what does this really mean and what can be done about it?

Silja Chouquet, founder and CEO of merakoi will share how we can build digital trust with the online community effectively and ethically by engaging with patient experts, so they can benefit from digital health solutions. What are the key touch-points in the patient journey where digital health solutions can add the ​most value?

Dr. Helene Mountz, Global Marketing Director, PAH Market Development, Actelion – Johnson & Johnson will share her experience of working with a group of key stakeholders in developing and launching such a digital project, with the aim to benefit both clinicians and patients suffering from pulmonary hypertension. Engaging clinicians to learn how to detect a rare disease, for the benefit of patients is the driver of the Echoright working team, and we will see how this initiative is positioned as the first step of a global mid- to long-term digital approach to medical education and is part of a global initiative, dedicated to further accelerating the diagnosis of this rare condition in populations at risk.

AGENDA

6:00-6:30pm: Registration

6:30 – 6:40 pm: iWiS introduction, Bejal Joshi Founder and CEO iWiS

6:40 – 7:00 pm: Christine Jacob, Founder and Managing Director of Digi-Bridges

7:00 – 7:20 pm: Helene Mounty, Global Marketing Director, PAH Market Development, Actelion

7:20 – 7:40 pm: Silja Chouquet, Founder and CEO of merakoi

7:40 – 8:00 pm: Panel Q&A/Discussion moderated by Jolanda Groenhuijzen, Co-Founder iWiS

8:00 – 8:15 pm: iWiS/WiDH power of collaboration

8:15 -9:30 pm: Special apéro

LOCATION

Der Teufelhof Basel
Leonhardsgraben 47-49
Basel

Join us at the event and be inspired!

11.9.2019: “Challenges of Women in Digital Health and Health IT – How to make an Impact”

Very excited to announce that our next event will be a “Women in Digital Health Session” on the topic Challenges of Women in Digital Health and Health IT – How to make an Impact at the HIMSS Europe ‘s Swiss eHealth Summit.

WHAT TO EXPECT

The interactive session (in English and German) will feature talks by female digital health experts from our community who are working in diverse roles within the digital healthcare space – including digital governance, business development, software development, health-tech accelerator, and clinical information systems.

AGENDA

13:00- 15:00 Uhr

LOCATION

Hotel Schweizerhof, Bern

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Safia Agueni: Head of Digital Governance, Novartis
Emily Andreae: Head of Business Development Health, adesso AG
Susanne Suter: Software Development, Super Computing System
Tram Trinh: CEO, Vitalink Health-Teach Accelerator in Paris
Melisa Zoronjic: Senior-Clinic Information Systems Application Manager, Hirslanden-Spitalgruppe

TICKET INFORMATION

To book a ticket, please register here and choose the option “Workshops only 11.09.19”


Each ticket costs 20CHF, with limited seats available, including the apéro riche afterwards to network at the exclusive event location Hotel Schweizerhof (next to the main station in Bern). Should the workshop be fully-booked, you can request to be placed on a waiting list by writing to acsismazia@himss.org

Digital hospitals help doctors provide better patient care. Here’s why.

Digital transformation is set to revolutionize how hospitals deliver care. But is digital technology being harnessed equally effectively across all aspects of the healthcare system? “Not quite,” pointed out Pamina Göttelmann, Business Development Manager of imito AG. “Digital technology is well-adopted in areas such as diagnostics and treatment. But if you look at systems for documentation management and communications, technology can still play a bigger role in improving how these processes work.”

In hospitals today, for every hour a physician spends with a patient, they spend an estimated two hours updating the patient’s electronic health record. Unsurprisingly, a recent survey by Merritt Hawkins found that more than 78% of physicians experience periodic feelings of professional burnout due to factors such as loss of clinical autonomy, diminished time with patients, and the administrative burdens of updating electronic health records. “The workload and documentation load of nurses and doctors have increased. Today, everything needs to be documented, and this can be incredibly time-consuming. This is where new technologies can help,” she elaborated.

We rely on medical professionals to provide excellent medical care especially in their direct interactions with patients. So, when hospitals utilize digital technology to improve their legacy documentation management and communication systems, doctors and nurses will be able to focus on what matters most – the patient.

Smartphone technology makes better doctors 

We recently spoke with Pamina, who shared with us about how her team is harnessing smartphone technology to streamline clinical processes in hospitals in Switzerland. The imito mobile app integrates seamlessly into the various systems used in hospitals (e.g. user identification, electronic medical records, archival of images), equipping medical professionals with a user-friendly tool to document photos or videos and communicate directly at a patient’s bedside, scan and save important documents, and digitally measure wounds, everything directly saved in electronic medical records, only while using a smartphone.

“Smartphone technology is not a new technology, but it is relatively under-utilized in the healthcare sector, especially in hospitals,” she explained. At least officially. According to survey results, more than 50% of doctors who work in hospitals use their smartphones for clinical documentation. These are exchanged via Messenger apps such as Whatsapp to gather feedback from more experienced colleagues. Under these conditions, data security is a concern.

When implemented effectively, however, app technology can help keep electronic health records accurate and facilitate the transfer of patient medical data between different healthcare institutions.

The cost of going digital 

The benefits of digitally transforming processes in hospitals are well-documented. In fact, healthcare professionals Pamina’s team spoke to want these systems improved. But convincing decision-makers in hospital management to invest can be a challenge. “If the IT department in the hospital is strong and innovative, they are more likely to get pilots funded. Otherwise budget can be a real issue,” shared Pamina.

This is because overhauling legacy documentation management and communication systems, while necessary, can be costly. As a significant example, The Lucerne Cantonal Hospital purchased a new clinical informational system from the American software manufacturer, Epic, for 65.4 million francs (excluding MWST) in 2016. This cost includes the investment and operational costs for 8 years. A centralized IT solution for all medical, patient-related, and administrative data, implementing it requires the hospital to significantly rethink how its systems operate, how its medical professionals work, and the care that its patients receive.

Though hospitals that opt for digital health products that integrate with their current systems instead of a complete overhaul will find it lighter on their wallets, budgets for such changes still remain tight. This is where having the support of healthcare professionals can make a huge difference. “You have to be very patient. But if your product’s core functionalities are based on solving real pain points that doctors and nurses feel every day, it will eventually succeed. If you show healthcare professionals the potential benefits, their support could mean convincing hospital management to implement your solution,” explained Pamina.

Transforming patient care by supporting digital hospitals in improving its processes, therefore, is a marathon, not a sprint.

What’s next

The future of the digital hospital looks promising. Many new technologies continue to emerge to bridge the gap between patient care and process. New models of digital hospitals continue to develop, such as the “cognitive hospital”, a next-generation hospital that is a “smart” facility itself and a strategic partner in patient care.

However, much of this future depends on how the healthcare industry solves this major challenge: Ensuring medical data security while enabling interoperability between systems. “The digital hospital is data-driven. Sharing medical data across healthcare institutions, however, is so difficult because it remains in isolated information silos. This is one of the reasons why progress continues to be slow,” concluded Pamina.

About Pamina Göttelmann

Pamina_G

After completing her master thesis “Setting Investment Priorities for Mobile Solutions in Hospitals”, Pamina deepened her acquired knowledge with valuable field experience in mHealth. As a project manager at the University Hospital of Zurich, she initiated the introduction of mobile clinical app solutions in the hospital and was responsible for the development of its corporate mobile strategy. She has co-authored and shared some of her field experience in two publications. Pamina joined imito in November 2018 as the Business Development Manager.


About the author

Aisha Schnellmann is a Singaporean sociologist by training, interested in healthcare, education, and sustainability issues. She is passionate about producing content that promotes meaningful dialogue, focusing on print and digital content that resonates with a strong call-to-action. Based in Zurich, her interest in digital healthcare grew from the conversations she had with committed medical staff in rural hospitals in Asia, who remain hard-pressed with the technology available to them.